Juliette Scott

Art has always played an important part in Juliette’s life. It was one of her favourite subjects at school and she has a B.A. Hons in History of Art from Nottingham University. On graduating Juliette worked at Bonham’s Auction House in London and later for the Art Loss Register. When she moved up to Northumberland Juliette took a long-distance diploma course in Interior Design and she has worked as an Interior Designer for fourteen years, both for the residential and commercial sectors. 

 

Juliette has always dabbled with photography but she became seriously interested about five years ago.  Colour is key to her photography and whether in the UK or abroad, she finds excitement and inspiration from the land, sky and sea throughout the changing seasons.

 

Flowers, leaves and trees feature strongly in her work. Juliette has grown up with a love of gardens primarily due to her father who worked in horticulture. Her garden in Northumberland is one of her favourite places to spend time as the flowers and foliage allow Juliette to not only engage with her love of colour but also with structure and light.

 

Although Juliette often follows the more traditional photographic techniques when capturing landscapes and flowers, she is increasingly adopting some of the slightly more unusual approaches.  She especially likes to experiment with Intentional Camera Movement and Multiple Exposures which help her produce a more impressionistic, painterly style of photography. Juliette loves creating a less literal representation of what she is actually seeing. Juliette believes that the results of these photographs are more compelling, atmospheric, and emotive. She has long been an admirer of both Turner and the Impressionists and she continues to be hugely inspired by their works. 

Juliette also enjoys Macro photography and using her light pad to bring out plant details and structure. This has been fuelled by her infatuation with the intricate floral paintings from the Dutch masters working during the 17th and 18th centuries.   

 

Her images are printed on to archival matt art papers and on some of her works she applies metal leaf to further enhance specific details after printing. This is particularly compatible with her impressionistic photography and it is exciting to be creating works with a slightly more mixed media feel.  

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